Three Guineas

Three Guineas

Paperback - 1977
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Three Guineas is written as a series of letters in which Virginia Woolf ponders the efficacy of donating to various causes to prevent war. In reflecting on her situation as the "daughter of an educated man" in 1930s England, Woolf challenges liberal orthodoxies and marshals vast research to make discomforting and still-challenging arguments about the relationship between gender and violence, and about the pieties of those who fail to see their complicity in war-making. This pacifist-feminist essay is a classic whose message resonates loudly in our contemporary global situation.Annotated and with an introduction by Jane Marcus
Publisher: Harmondsworth, Middlesex, Eng. : Penguin books, 1977.
ISBN: 9780140044942
0140044949
Characteristics: 205 pages ;,18 cm.

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smilegirl24
Jul 12, 2012

The ideas presented in this book about feminism and pacifism are quite interesting, and I enjoyed thinking about them even after I finished the book. However, be warned: this is a very slow and somewhat boring read.

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smilegirl24
Jul 12, 2012

smilegirl24 thinks this title is suitable for 15 years and over

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smilegirl24
Jul 12, 2012

In this non-fiction work, Virginia Woolf presents three letters to "a man" regarding how a woman might prevent war. The letters showcase the feminist ideas of the age of anxiety and the terribly unstable world Virginia Woolf lived in while writing her book.

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smilegirl24
Jul 12, 2012

No guinea of earned money should go to rebuilding the college on the old plan just as certainly none could be spent upon building a college upon a new plan: therefore the guinea should be earmarked "Rags. Petrol. Matches." And this note should be attached to it. "Take this guinea and with it burn the college to the ground. Set fire to the old hypocrisies. Let the light of the burning building scare the nightingales and incarnadine the willows. And let the daughters of educated men dance round the fire and heap armful upon armful of dead leaves upon the flames. And let their mothers lean from the upper windows and cry, "Let it blaze! Let it blaze! For we have done with this 'education!”
― Virginia Woolf, Three Guineas

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