Away From Her

Away From Her

DVD - 2007
Average Rating:
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Grant and Fiona, an Ontario couple married for over forty years, have an unwavering commitment to each other, which is broken by the wife's evident memory loss. Grant has to cope with the institutionalization of his wife, because of her Alzheimer's disease, and faces an epiphany when she transfers her affections to another man, a wheel chair-bound mute who is a patient at the nursing home. Grant must draw upon his love for Fiona to perform an act of self-sacrifice in order to ensure her happiness.

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Manfredchensenjen
May 08, 2016

This is a wonderful story about karma. Did he kill something inside her with his cheating? All those decades he thought she never suspected. Now he either has to face the fact that she does not love him any more, but instead is having a rapturous, teenage Romeo & Juliet-type romance with someone in the nursing home, or she is getting her revenge, because she always knew she had married someone with a cheating heart. Maybe I saw a different movie from the other reviewers? You can also read the short story by Alice Munro. Anyway, I thought it was a great story about "Hogamus, higamus, men are polygamous; higamus, hogamus, women are monogamous." (William James was experimenting with hallucinogens and discovered the "underlying truth of the universe" and that is what he wrote down.)

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fdb045
Apr 30, 2016

Warning - this is not entertainment.
While well done, it is a dramatized documentary about an older couple experiencing the ravages of dementia.

Having lived through this with my husband's dementia, some of the nursing home experiences were just too true. But the wife was just too high functioning at the end to be believable and the husband was very 'wooden' as someone below describes his acting. Close but no cigar guys!

17Mary Aug 11, 2015

I had to review this film for my final assignment in a Retirement Communities Mgmt program & this course changed the way I viewed this film. I finally learned about Alzheimer's & related diseases, how to seek help, & how to treat people with the disease with respect.

h
haileyj
Aug 10, 2015

A wooden performance by Gordon Pinsent. All his emotions are illustrated by him staring into the distance. Julie Christie was a little more believable. The movie reeked of a mediocre CBC production.

n
Nursebob
Jan 03, 2015

A soft, gentle film about a couple coming undone due to Alzheimer’s disease. As Grant enters his autumn years, Fiona slowly retreats into an eternal springtime of sunshine and fading memories. Pinsent plays the husband with great restraint, often using nothing more than a glance to convey the depths of the man’s despair while Christie brings a sense of graceful dignity to Fiona, holding her head high even as she fades away. But it is Dukakis’ crusty yet practical Marian that keeps the film firmly anchored and prevents it from slipping into maudlin sentimentality. Polley accents the film with subtle shifts of timelines, a keen eye for visuals....blue shadows in a wintry wood, delicate wildflowers covered in frost.....and a few sly elements of pure Canadiana that let you know this film belongs north of the 49th. A remarkable achievement.

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Helene1
Dec 06, 2014

This video is defective - it stopped around 1:05 and I couldn't fast forward or anything to get the movie going again.

j
jmikesmith
Nov 24, 2014

Grant (Gordon Pinsent) just wants to be with his wife of 44 years, Fiona (Julie Christie). But Fiona knows and accepts that dementia is setting in, and she's losing herself. This Canadian film by first-time director Sarah Polley captures Grant's struggles to come to terms with Fiona's journey into senility.

The acting in this simple tale based on an Alice Munro short story is powerful and compelling. The staging and cinematography, however, are odd at times. There are some beautiful scenes, but there are also some scenes that either contain ambiguous symbolism or outright continuity errors. Although the story seems to cover at least a year, all the scenes are shot in winter; characters are always bundled up in heavy coats and scarves. Cross-country skiing is a recurring motif. It's as though Polley is experimenting with different camera and lighting techniques on her first feature, so there is an inconsistent feel to the visuals.

Still, this is a proud Canadian film that is touching and heartfelt.

voisjoe1 Jul 18, 2014

Julie Christie, one of the best British actors ever, plays a wife being afflicted with the onset of Alzheimer’s disease. It is the first time I have seen Christie in a serious film in the last 30 years and she is great. Sadly for film fans, this will probably be her last serious film as she herself has been afflicted with a rare disorder called autobiographic amnesia. A great lesson of this film is that nothing in life lasts forever, so maybe we should appreciate the good things in life a little bit more when we have them. Remember the older films where vampires stole our loved ones from us. Well now we have Alzheimer’s disease that steals our souls from us. This is something ugly that we must acknowledge, so live life the best while you have the opportunity.

p
peanut1013
Jul 18, 2014

movie drug some, loved Julie Christie but the plot was uninteresting

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dparent
Mar 01, 2009

An older couple who have been married for a lifetime face a challenging time when they realize that the wife has Alzheimer's. They have never been separated and suddenly she must be placed in a home for her safety.

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